Posts Tagged ‘Transformation’

Questions of Change

March 11th, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Psychology

Human potential implies the need to change and grow, for potential is something not yet there that could be there. For people, change is largely a matter of examining and then changing beliefs.

In a leadership meeting at the Wright Leadership Institute this morning, Dr. Robert Wright of the Wright Leadership Institute suggested that beliefs fall into an intersection of beliefs and expectations between the individual and the world, as suggested by these questions:

What’s my belief about nature of the world?

What I can expect of the world?

What’s the world’s belief about nature of me?

What can the world expect of me?

Beliefs are often mistaken, and those are the four categories of where mistaken beliefs fall.

Human change and development as an intentional act considers to additional questions, Dr. Wright suggests:

What are the beliefs you are challenging?

What are the new beliefs you are building?

The institute’s MORE Life training is one of the best overall training experiences you can do to find answers to those questions. To read why I recommend for business, read the blog post at:

http://bit.ly/aqSQd0

Better yet, use this code to register for free: LinkedIn

I’ll be there challenging my own beliefs about myself and building new leadership skills and beliefs by leading the production team. Hope to see you there, too.

What beliefs are you challenging?

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Host

February 7th, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Philosophy, Psychology

One of the more profound experiences I have had in learning how to participate in and lead small groups is my experience joining a group of people I did not know in the role of host. The host role, as understood in etiquette, is the person who meets and greets people and makes sure that they feel comfortable. Typically, the host either knows everyone or represents the place, as in a restaurant.

As an assignment in a personal power learning laboratory at the Wright Leadership Institute, however, the host or hostess role is an assignment given to a new member of the lab, a small group for learning personal life and leadership skills. Assignments form a major part of the learning methodology at WLI and collectively make up the Assignment Way of Living, in which students do assignments in their daily life to master life and leadership skills and behaviors.

The idea behind the Host/Hostess assignment is to introduce yourself to a group. It’s a counter-intuitive assignment in some ways because most of us generally think of a host or hostess as someone who welcomes other people to a party or a restaurant and makes them feel comfortable with the place or with the other guests.

In the Host assignment, in contrast, it was up to me to make myself comfortable, to make myself part of the group. WLI assignments are rooted in the existentialist concept of authenticity. They allow an individual to discover, explore, and practice their own sense of self in relation to other people and to ultimately take responsibility for their own sense of well being. The host assignment is a perfect example.

As a host in this sense, you take responsibility for including yourself in the group. The assignment can be done quite literally, with the new group member greeting each person as they enter the group or serving refreshments before the group begins. Further, the group host may work to see that other group members include themselves in the conversation.

The assignment was quite profound for me. Like many people, I was used to having others include me in a conversation or see that I felt comfortable in a situation. I realized in doing the assignment that it was not up to others to see that I included myself or felt comfortable. It was up to me.

By extending myself to people I did not know and make sure that they felt comfortable with and knew me, I gained a greater acceptance of other people in the group–and of myself as a member of the group. This was a critical first lesson on group dynamics–that belonging to a group is a critical responsibility of the group member.

I belonged not because the other group members helped me belong but because I decided I belonged and, in effect, proved it to the other group members in my performance of the assignment by my welcoming behaviors, which, ultimately, showed them that I had made the effort to get to know them in some personal way. Therein lies a key skill in mastering groups, whether for task performance, business networking, or social interaction.

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Liberating

February 3rd, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Personal, Psychology

I’m stepping back tonight after completing the second part of a week and a half of the 2010 Men’s Leadership Development training, in which I and my leadership colleagues have been setting the themes and planning our goals for 2010. We’ve been using Dr. Judith Wright’s Evolating model for personal transformation as both a touchstone and tool to guide our ongoing planning.

Liberating is the fourth stage of the model, before rematrixing, which I wrote about on Monday. The Evolating model describes a process of “discontinuous change or transformation to a more advanced stage of being,” and as a result, it deals with ways of being and styles of attitude more than concrete goals.

Liberating is just that–a liberation in the form of new behaviors, attitudes, and ways of being. Liberating comes after the revelating stage, in which patterns of behavior or thinking are revealed.

Revelating is the insight that may or may not lead to change. In many cases, an insight into a faulty thinking pattern may remain an insight, and the faulty thinking remains. With liberating, you experience the freedom of breaking through, of trying new things, of experiencing new sensations and feelings, of thinking in new ways, or all of those and more.

My liberating experience started last week as I noticed some long-standing attitudes that have limited my firm’s growth for years. Many lie in the experiences I had in growing up in small businesses on both sides of my family, and I have seen both how those experiences have kept the firm going for 20 years but with a pattern of control that limited their size.

The pictures at the top of the page, of my 50th birthday celebration, are another example of liberation. I almost didn’t have a party at all, and instead I used the experience as an ongoing project of looking back in order to look forward.

Seeing what I have accomplished, as well as the gaps–personally and as a result of my family experiences–has been freeing, showing me what I have to draw on as well as where I need to retrain myself. Therein lie the seeds of liberating behaviors that lead to lifelong lasting change–and business growth in 2010.

m stepping back tonight after completing the second part of a week and a half of the 2010 Men’s Leadership Development training, in which I and my leadership colleagues have been setting the themes and planning our goals for 2010. We’ve been using Dr. Judith Wright’s Evolating model for personal transformation as both a touchstone and tool to guide our ongoing planning.

Liberating is the fourth stage of the model, before Rematrixing, which I wrote about on Monday. The Evolating model describes a process of “discontinuous change or transformation to a more advanced stage of being,” and as a result, it deals with ways of being and styles of attitude more than concrete goals.

Liberating is just that–a liberation in the form of new behaviors, attitudes, and ways of being. Liberating comes after the revelating stage, in which patterns of behavior or thinking are revealed.

Revelating is the insight that may or may not lead to change. In many cases, an insight into a faulty thinking pattern may remain an insight, and the faulty thinking remains. With liberating, you experience the freedom of breaking through, of trying new things, of experiencing new sensations and feelings, of thinking in new ways, or all of those and more.

My liberating experience started last week as I noticed some long-standing attitudes that have limited my firm’s growth for years. Many lie in the experiences I had in growing up in small businesses on both sides of my family, and I have seen both how those experiences have kept the firm going for 20 years but with a pattern of control that limited their size.

The pictures at the top of the page, of my 50th birthday celebration, are another example of liberation. I almost didn’t have a party at all, and instead I used the experience as an ongoing project of looking back in order to look forward.

Seeing what I have accomplished, as well as the gaps–personally and as a result of my family experiences–has been freeing, showing me what I have to draw on as well as where I need to retrain myself. Therein lie the seeds of liberating behaviors that lead to lifelong lasting change.

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Rematrixing

February 1st, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Psychology

Rematrixing is the fifth stage in Dr. Judith Wright’s Evolating model for personal transformation. Rematrixing is the crux of the model, the stage that separates real long-term, core change from learning and growing, the stage where a person experiences, in Dr. Wright’s words, “discontinuous change or transformation to a more advanced stage of being.”

My leadership colleagues and I have been working through the model last week and this week at Men’s Leadership Development Week at the Wright Leadership Institute. I have previously posted on the engagement and revelating stages of the Evolating model.

In revelating, we are gaining insight into the way we operate, revealing the matrix of rules, myths, and beliefs from which we operate. As in the movie, The Matrix, that set of rules myths and beliefs are extremely powerful in determining the nature of a person’s reality–and only as powerful as a person makes them.

In the terms of Dr. Alfred Adler, the Viennese psychiatrist who founded the field individual psychology beginning about 100 years ago, people operate on a set of mistaken beliefs learned in childhood. Therein lies the foundation of a person’s matrix, and it’s a deep foundation because it goes back generations, for the family and as a result for the individual.

Rematrixing is a difficult job that takes intention, discipline, support, and accountability. It goes beyond setting and achieving goals; it’s completely new ways of being, thinking, and acting. It’s living in a completely new way and involves shifting beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors, as well as achieving goals.

We will start by mapping our existing matrix and clarifying our new matrix. We should end up with a map that looks like a network diagram, with core sets of beliefs as the nodes.

From that, we will plan individual change, including support systems and disciplines to change one small thinking pattern and behavior after another. More on how that works to come. . .

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