Posts Tagged ‘Leadership’

MORE Life

March 1st, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Business

I go to a lot of events in Chicago and attended more than my share of training programs, conferences, and seminars. In the Canright Calendar, a listing of Chicago networking events, I list those I would (but not necessarily will) attend.

I don’t make recommendations lightly. I highly recommend the MORE Life Training, and I recommend it not only as a way to improve life overall but also as a business skills training.

The MORE Life Training, however, is not specifically promoted as a business training seminar, and on the face of it, it isn’t. The focus on the weekend is on the individual, with an emphasis on discovering what really matters to you; being more truthful and expressive, more honest and genuine; discovering how to use your personal power toward your goals and dreams; and being more engaged with other people–more yourself.

But aren’t these the most critical skills we need as business leaders? It may not be a business seminar, but it sure sounds like good ways of being in business to me. I have used it the skills from MORE Life—and like many business training seminars, it is skills based—to learn how to build rapport for improving sales and project results. I have increasingly told the truth to clients, including things that I know they don’t want to hear, and in some cases I have been able to charge more as a consultant, as opposed to a writer and project manager. I have also become a better leader by seeing the person in the role, by keeping a bigger picture in mind as well as the details.

The weekend is about knowing yourself and how you think and feel, what deeply held beliefs you based your decisions and actions on, and which of those beliefs work and which lead to, shall we say, less than satisfying results in life, love, and career. You also learn tools you can use to change the beliefs and ways of being that you don’t like.

Take a look at the MORE Life registration page, and you see good marketing copy, benefits oriented, on how the training will change your life. All three of the video testimonials on the page are inspiring. I know the people in the videos and how they learned to stand up for themselves, become more expressive, or operate with more integrity.

Seminar leaders Dr. Judith Wright and Dr. Robert Wright focus on skills within a framework of research in neuroscience, a model of human development, and a theory of human growth and change. You can read bits about Dr. Judith Wright’s Theory of Evolating in these blog posts:

Learn more about the Institute in the Wright Leadership Institute blogs. And register for MORE Life.

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Liberating

February 3rd, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Personal, Psychology

I’m stepping back tonight after completing the second part of a week and a half of the 2010 Men’s Leadership Development training, in which I and my leadership colleagues have been setting the themes and planning our goals for 2010. We’ve been using Dr. Judith Wright’s Evolating model for personal transformation as both a touchstone and tool to guide our ongoing planning.

Liberating is the fourth stage of the model, before rematrixing, which I wrote about on Monday. The Evolating model describes a process of “discontinuous change or transformation to a more advanced stage of being,” and as a result, it deals with ways of being and styles of attitude more than concrete goals.

Liberating is just that–a liberation in the form of new behaviors, attitudes, and ways of being. Liberating comes after the revelating stage, in which patterns of behavior or thinking are revealed.

Revelating is the insight that may or may not lead to change. In many cases, an insight into a faulty thinking pattern may remain an insight, and the faulty thinking remains. With liberating, you experience the freedom of breaking through, of trying new things, of experiencing new sensations and feelings, of thinking in new ways, or all of those and more.

My liberating experience started last week as I noticed some long-standing attitudes that have limited my firm’s growth for years. Many lie in the experiences I had in growing up in small businesses on both sides of my family, and I have seen both how those experiences have kept the firm going for 20 years but with a pattern of control that limited their size.

The pictures at the top of the page, of my 50th birthday celebration, are another example of liberation. I almost didn’t have a party at all, and instead I used the experience as an ongoing project of looking back in order to look forward.

Seeing what I have accomplished, as well as the gaps–personally and as a result of my family experiences–has been freeing, showing me what I have to draw on as well as where I need to retrain myself. Therein lie the seeds of liberating behaviors that lead to lifelong lasting change–and business growth in 2010.

m stepping back tonight after completing the second part of a week and a half of the 2010 Men’s Leadership Development training, in which I and my leadership colleagues have been setting the themes and planning our goals for 2010. We’ve been using Dr. Judith Wright’s Evolating model for personal transformation as both a touchstone and tool to guide our ongoing planning.

Liberating is the fourth stage of the model, before Rematrixing, which I wrote about on Monday. The Evolating model describes a process of “discontinuous change or transformation to a more advanced stage of being,” and as a result, it deals with ways of being and styles of attitude more than concrete goals.

Liberating is just that–a liberation in the form of new behaviors, attitudes, and ways of being. Liberating comes after the revelating stage, in which patterns of behavior or thinking are revealed.

Revelating is the insight that may or may not lead to change. In many cases, an insight into a faulty thinking pattern may remain an insight, and the faulty thinking remains. With liberating, you experience the freedom of breaking through, of trying new things, of experiencing new sensations and feelings, of thinking in new ways, or all of those and more.

My liberating experience started last week as I noticed some long-standing attitudes that have limited my firm’s growth for years. Many lie in the experiences I had in growing up in small businesses on both sides of my family, and I have seen both how those experiences have kept the firm going for 20 years but with a pattern of control that limited their size.

The pictures at the top of the page, of my 50th birthday celebration, are another example of liberation. I almost didn’t have a party at all, and instead I used the experience as an ongoing project of looking back in order to look forward.

Seeing what I have accomplished, as well as the gaps–personally and as a result of my family experiences–has been freeing, showing me what I have to draw on as well as where I need to retrain myself. Therein lie the seeds of liberating behaviors that lead to lifelong lasting change.

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Rematrixing

February 1st, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Psychology

Rematrixing is the fifth stage in Dr. Judith Wright’s Evolating model for personal transformation. Rematrixing is the crux of the model, the stage that separates real long-term, core change from learning and growing, the stage where a person experiences, in Dr. Wright’s words, “discontinuous change or transformation to a more advanced stage of being.”

My leadership colleagues and I have been working through the model last week and this week at Men’s Leadership Development Week at the Wright Leadership Institute. I have previously posted on the engagement and revelating stages of the Evolating model.

In revelating, we are gaining insight into the way we operate, revealing the matrix of rules, myths, and beliefs from which we operate. As in the movie, The Matrix, that set of rules myths and beliefs are extremely powerful in determining the nature of a person’s reality–and only as powerful as a person makes them.

In the terms of Dr. Alfred Adler, the Viennese psychiatrist who founded the field individual psychology beginning about 100 years ago, people operate on a set of mistaken beliefs learned in childhood. Therein lies the foundation of a person’s matrix, and it’s a deep foundation because it goes back generations, for the family and as a result for the individual.

Rematrixing is a difficult job that takes intention, discipline, support, and accountability. It goes beyond setting and achieving goals; it’s completely new ways of being, thinking, and acting. It’s living in a completely new way and involves shifting beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors, as well as achieving goals.

We will start by mapping our existing matrix and clarifying our new matrix. We should end up with a map that looks like a network diagram, with core sets of beliefs as the nodes.

From that, we will plan individual change, including support systems and disciplines to change one small thinking pattern and behavior after another. More on how that works to come. . .

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Revelating

January 27th, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Psychology

Revelating is the third stage in Dr. Judith Wright’s Evolating model for personal transformation. The model itself described how people change. Not just learning and growing, but “discontinuous change or transformation to a more advanced stage of being.”

My leadership colleagues and I have been working through the model this week at Men’s Leadership Development Week at the Wright Leadership Institute. My post yesterday on engagement covered the second stage in the Evolating model.

My experience with revelating was quite profound. In refining the definition this morning, I focused on a personal example to help refine an operational definition of revolating, which in essence is comprehending the psychological matrix in which one lives. It involves seeing how you work and understanding your operating system, but further seeing how your current way of being creates blocks that prevent growth, change, and transformation.

In my case, one of the blocks is self pity. I caught myself feeling very tired and discouraged as I replayed an email on an important sale I lost. That loss was headed toward defining the whole day as terrible. It was not by any means, and I noticed that tendency in my psychology.

Noticing that part of the matrix presents an opportunity for a shift. I decided I did not have any time to feel sorry for myself and did not. I’m still upset by the loss, but by not putting the energy into feeling sorry for myself or making an entire day a loss, I have been able to see how I can prevent that kind of loss in the future–by using as a model an excellent and highly engaged meeting with another client just before I received the email about the loss.

I had further extended my revelating experience by uncovering a long-standing and deeply held belief that I do not measure up, no matter how hard I try. I won’t go into the details on that one now, but it was a profound experience because it brought to my consciousness a belief that has formed my perception of myself and the world for many many years. Through that initial conscious, however, the hold of  the belief unlocks and change is possible.

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