Archive for the ‘Psychology’ Category

Rematrixing

February 1st, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Psychology

Rematrixing is the fifth stage in Dr. Judith Wright’s Evolating model for personal transformation. Rematrixing is the crux of the model, the stage that separates real long-term, core change from learning and growing, the stage where a person experiences, in Dr. Wright’s words, “discontinuous change or transformation to a more advanced stage of being.”

My leadership colleagues and I have been working through the model last week and this week at Men’s Leadership Development Week at the Wright Leadership Institute. I have previously posted on the engagement and revelating stages of the Evolating model.

In revelating, we are gaining insight into the way we operate, revealing the matrix of rules, myths, and beliefs from which we operate. As in the movie, The Matrix, that set of rules myths and beliefs are extremely powerful in determining the nature of a person’s reality–and only as powerful as a person makes them.

In the terms of Dr. Alfred Adler, the Viennese psychiatrist who founded the field individual psychology beginning about 100 years ago, people operate on a set of mistaken beliefs learned in childhood. Therein lies the foundation of a person’s matrix, and it’s a deep foundation because it goes back generations, for the family and as a result for the individual.

Rematrixing is a difficult job that takes intention, discipline, support, and accountability. It goes beyond setting and achieving goals; it’s completely new ways of being, thinking, and acting. It’s living in a completely new way and involves shifting beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors, as well as achieving goals.

We will start by mapping our existing matrix and clarifying our new matrix. We should end up with a map that looks like a network diagram, with core sets of beliefs as the nodes.

From that, we will plan individual change, including support systems and disciplines to change one small thinking pattern and behavior after another. More on how that works to come. . .

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Life Purpose and Spirituality

January 28th, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Philosophy, Psychology
I am considering the possibility that fear and anxiety are spiritual offerings to God. It’s a suggestion from my Ideal State Action Plan today at the Men’s Leadership Development Week at the Wright Leadership Institute. I’m not sure I buy it exactly, but I like the idea of the spiritual manifesting itself in daily living.
I have been exploring spirituality from that perspective in my studies the Wright Graduate Institute for the Realization of Human Potential. In my overview paper on Life Purpose and Spirituality course, I accept the view that a mature conception of life purpose and spirituality unites the two in daily living. The paper provides a survey of the philosophical and psychological traditions in which a person’s life purpose and spirituality are integral to daily human existence.

Traditionally, spirituality is ­the realm of the world’s religions, while purpose is often considered in terms of practical work. In more recent times, Western philosophers and psychologists have united the two, where spirituality and purpose form a unity of human daily existence.

Read the paper and let me know what you think.

Revelating

January 27th, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Psychology

Revelating is the third stage in Dr. Judith Wright’s Evolating model for personal transformation. The model itself described how people change. Not just learning and growing, but “discontinuous change or transformation to a more advanced stage of being.”

My leadership colleagues and I have been working through the model this week at Men’s Leadership Development Week at the Wright Leadership Institute. My post yesterday on engagement covered the second stage in the Evolating model.

My experience with revelating was quite profound. In refining the definition this morning, I focused on a personal example to help refine an operational definition of revolating, which in essence is comprehending the psychological matrix in which one lives. It involves seeing how you work and understanding your operating system, but further seeing how your current way of being creates blocks that prevent growth, change, and transformation.

In my case, one of the blocks is self pity. I caught myself feeling very tired and discouraged as I replayed an email on an important sale I lost. That loss was headed toward defining the whole day as terrible. It was not by any means, and I noticed that tendency in my psychology.

Noticing that part of the matrix presents an opportunity for a shift. I decided I did not have any time to feel sorry for myself and did not. I’m still upset by the loss, but by not putting the energy into feeling sorry for myself or making an entire day a loss, I have been able to see how I can prevent that kind of loss in the future–by using as a model an excellent and highly engaged meeting with another client just before I received the email about the loss.

I had further extended my revelating experience by uncovering a long-standing and deeply held belief that I do not measure up, no matter how hard I try. I won’t go into the details on that one now, but it was a profound experience because it brought to my consciousness a belief that has formed my perception of myself and the world for many many years. Through that initial conscious, however, the hold of  the belief unlocks and change is possible.

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Engagement

January 26th, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Philosophy, Psychology

Today I considered engagement and what it means to live an engaged life. This is a way of living and being that I have explored for years, but today at the Men’s Leadership Development Week at the Wright Leadership Institute the deeper meaning of engagement as a way of being began to become more clear.

To say “way of being” is to use language with the tones of existential philosophy, but to use it in a practical, living sense, not solely an intellectual sense. Choice is one of the primary existential principles of living, and engagement is a choice.

In existential terms, it is a choice of being or nonbeing, a choice of living or not living, at least in the sense that to be alive is to be conscious and aware of oneself and one’s internal and external states and feelings. Engagement in this sense is to be or not to be.

In daily terms, being and nonbeing is not so lofty as it may sound. It’s picking up the phone to make a cold sales call–or not. It’s telling your spouse that you’re angry and why–or not. It’s correcting an employee–or not. It’s asking someone to lunch–or not.

In any of those acts, there is a risk–the risk of rejection, or nonbeing. And with risk there is fear.

So engagement becomes facing fear and having mastery over fear. Think of when you have faced a fear and how satisfying that feeling is. That is the satisfaction of engagement.

For there is also a yearning or desire to have something more that leads to the decision to engage–or not.

Engagement is a fuller expression of self, a choice to be oneself, as opposed to a simple act. We are aiming to be fully engaged.

I have missed a lot of the subtleties here and a broader context of leadership development. More on engagement to come.

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