Archive for February, 2010

Nano Neuro

February 16th, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Technology

Tonight at the February meeting of MIT Enterprise Forum of Chicago I learned about nanotechnology and nanoscience, in an illuminating talk by Dr. Tijuana Rajh, Group Leader for the NanoBio Interface Group at Argonne National Laboratory and one of the nation’s leading experts on the topic.

Nanoscience forms the nexus of physics, chemistry, and biology and is the fastest developing science in the world, Dr. Rajh said, though I wonder if it’s developing as fast as the rapidly developing field of neuroscience.

There are similarities in that both are radically transforming how we see the world, and both are increasing our power over our world, the physical world in the case of nanoscience and the mental world in the case of neuroscience. Both have grown since the 1980s and 1990s as a result of increasingly sophisticated instruments that allow scientists to “see” unseen physical and biological processes.

I am more familiar with neuroscience as a result of my studies in psychology, but Dr. Rajh’s talk opened my eyes to how we can manipulate the physical world and create completely new materials and processes are a result of the new nano world. Just as we can alter the way we think, feel, and experience the world as a result of the new neuro insights into the brain and behavior.

I will explore these ideas more in the coming days.

See the posts Neuroscience and Nanoscience for more.

Tonight at the February meeting of MIT Enterprise Forum of Chicago I learned about nanotechnology and nanoscience, in an illuminating talk by Dr. Tijuana Rajh, Group Leader for the NanoBio Interface Group at Argonne National Laboratory and one of the nation’s leading experts on the topic.

Nanoscience forms the nexus of physics, chemistry, and biology and is the fastest developing science in the world, Dr. Rajh said, though I wonder if it’s developing as fast as the rapidly developing field of neuroscience.

There are similarities in that both are radically transforming how we see the world, and both are increasing our power over our world, the physical world in the case of nanoscience and the mental world in the case of neuroscience. Both have grown since the 1980s and 1990s as a result of increasingly sophisticated instruments that allow scientists to “see” unseen physical and biological processes.

I am more familiar with neuroscience as a result of my studies in psychology, but Dr. Rajh’s talk opened my eyes to how we can manipulate the physical world and create completely new materials and processes are a result of the new nano world. Just as we can alter the way we think, feel, and experience the world as a result of the new neuro insights into the brain and behavior.

I will explore these ideas more in the coming days.

LinkedIn Summary

February 15th, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Business

I had a call on our social media strategy and tactics today with Dean DeLisle, CEO of social media and sales consultancy ForwardProgress. We were talking about LinkedIn and using it to help generate the holy grail of sales: in bound leads. Good solid inbound leads.

Read how Dean helped the shoemakers rewrite their LinkedIn profiles in “Juice Up Your LinkedIn Summary,” in the Canright Communications Writer’s Blog.

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Ellsberg and Bach

February 14th, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in History

Two interviews caught my attention on Bob Edwards Weekend, one of my favorite radio shows. I grew up with TV and sometimes find it interesting that I’m a radio fan and haven’t watched network TV in close to 20 years.

I also grew up in a newspaper family that discussed the news all the time. One of the stories on the show today reminded me of the first news story I read daily, the Pentagon Papers story. By the time I was following it, The New York Times had published the Pentagon’s secret history of the Vietnam War given to it by Daniel Ellsberg, who researched the history and leaked it to the Times. Ellsburg was in hiding, the Nixon Administration and sued The Times, and its attempts to keep the story quiet, such as by breaking into the office of Ellsberg’s psychiatrist, were starting to come to light.

I was 12 and went straight to the paper after I got home from school. It was riveting drama.

Bob Edwards interviewed Ellsburg and the makers of the documentary, The Most Dangerous Man in America. I can’t wait to see it.

Bob Edwards also interviewed Eric Siblin, author of the book The Cello Suites: J.S. Bach, Pablo Casals, and the Search for a Baroque Masterpiece. I love Bach but wasn’t familiar with the Cello Suites.

The story in the interview I found most interesting concerned the influence of politics on music. Casals became a political figure when he decided he would not play in any country that recognized the Fanco government. Bach would not have had that kind of political experience, Siblin said, but may have been influenced by political events in a rather profound way.

The King of Prussia in the early 1700s decided to militarize the country and do away with anything that didn’t contribute to the cause, including the rolay orchestra That orchestra, however, was one of the best in Europe.

Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cöthens hired the unemployed musicians and, in couple years later, Bach. So Bach has the best orchestra in the world at his disposal and writes some of the most sublime music ever composed, including some of my my favorite Brandenburg Concerti.

I remember reading on the back of an album my mom had that the art of baroque trumpet had been lost for hundreds of years. It makes sense if they had been written for the greatest players of the time.

This reminds me of the stories in Malcom Gladwell’s book Outliers, in which he makes it clear that talent alone is not sufficient but circumstances beyond the individual contribute to success. As talented as he was, Bach apparently had political and military circumstances to provide the means of expressing his musical imagination.

Snow

February 9th, 2010 by Collin Canright | No Comments | Filed in Personal

I was the first one out on the street this morning, the first one out in the snow, the first one to make tracks in the street. It was 4:30 am, and it was very quiet.

The swoosh of the brush pushing the pile of flakes, dry like cereal flakes. I thought about how quiet it is when it snows, the snow not only looking like cotton but absorbing and muffling sound like a blanket.

I pulled onto the unbroken snow on Byron street and turned right onto Wolcott avenue, where I merged with the tire tracks of a car that had been headed east onto Byron before I got out but turned north onto Wolcott before it passed my house.

I stopped after I turned and got out to look at the perfect tracks in the perfect quiet of the perfect snow.